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Author Topic: Brexit  (Read 2491 times)

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alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #90 on: Tuesday 29-Jan-2019, 19:55* »
Really sorry you read it that way and for any offence caused - I didn’t mean anything personally and the toddlers in the analogy were the Rees-Moggs and Farages of this world who are responsible for this garbage rather than anyone here!!

I still think my analogy is a good one though...!

Britain, in my opinion, has done itself so much harm on the global stage through this process and it’s reputation as a solid and reliable partner is in shatters.

Sorry for those that made an informed choice on Brexit. You must be tearing your hair out.

The level of political and general pig ignorance from the public and our political leaders is staggering. Absolutely staggering. Sky did a poll and 26% apparently thought no deal meant we stay in the EU.

I give up. It’s shameful.

alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #91 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 08:41* »
Still in deadlock even though some claiming victory and clarity after last night’s amendments.

We really seem to be learning nothing.

Last night was really just negotiating amongst ourselves to come to a position that is in conflict to the agreed withdrawal position last year. The “solution” is incompatible with our own and the EU’s red lines it seems.

Absolutely baffling.

British exceptionalism at it’s weird and incompetent best.

The world is split between those laughing at us and those pitying us. How are we ever going to be able to negotiate trade deals when we have such a fundamentally basic lack of understanding of the treaties that we helped forge, and renege on our commitments and constantly change our minds?

deadlyfrom5yardsout

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #92 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 09:56* »
Looking ahead I can see a time when our exit has decimated our economy and we are going through a depression with massive unemployment and garbage piled high in the streets with no government agencies functioning properly and no effective Social Security payments being made and the NHS closing every other hospital. Or not.
Should this scenario come to pass, we will lickedy split be begging to rejoin the Common Market ( as it should be...). Time is a healer they say.

BedfordshireBoy

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #93 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 11:19* »
No doubt applying to rejoin without the concessions we enjoy at the moment no doubt.

deadlyfrom5yardsout

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #94 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 12:58* »
You are Jeremy Corben and I claim my £5! Repeating yourself.....

deadlyfrom5yardsout

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #95 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 13:04* »
I have just watched (endured) PMQ's and I have to say that tempers have cooled a lot since the vote a couple of weeks ago. There was a lot more nodding of heads from both sides and Jeremy Corben has been put in a position where he really has to get involved, or at least be seen to try and get involved, rather than just heckling from the sidelines and voting against absolutely everything.

Main point. Yes the House voted against a No Deal Brexit last night but it also voted on accepting the deal with a tweak on the backstop and voting for the deal is ultimately the only way to avoid a no deal.

Unless the House is unilaterally going to ignore the outcome of the referendum......

BedfordshireBoy

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #96 on: Wednesday 30-Jan-2019, 17:03* »
You are Jeremy Corben and I claim my £5! Repeating yourself.....

The ultimate insult.

alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #97 on: Friday 01-Feb-2019, 08:57* »
Incredibly amused by reports that even if things go as smoothly as they can, there won’t be enough time to pass all the legislation to actually leave on 29 March and therefore Article 50 will need to be extended.

Experts eh?

It sums up the incompetence and sheer fantasy of some.

The stench of corruption is growing. May promising Labour MPs funds in exchange for votes on deal.

We are a banana republic and if this was happening anywhere else in the world we’d all be sneering about it.

alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #98 on: Friday 01-Feb-2019, 09:00* »
In any normal democracy Brexit wouldn’t and couldn’t happen until the differences have been resolved and the sort of Brexit we were going to have had been defined, decided and agreed on by all. We are years away from this. Well done Tories. Well done UKIP. You’ve royally messed everything up.

Everyone’s a Quinner

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #99 on: Friday 01-Feb-2019, 11:24* »
Like him or loathe him or loaf him even 🍞:

The article 24 scenario is an interesting one which Farage suggested while in Europeon Parliment a couple of days ago. Juncker, Verhofstadt and Co. are normally seen sneering at anything Nige says however they seemed to have been caught unusally listening to him properly here, all the while looking expressionless, almost as though they fear that solution too as it makes things much easier and simpler. And they don’t like other countries like Italy warming to the idea of leaving too now do they.

A link for the video below:


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XR2snMKWbUM



I’m not saying every word he says perfect, but boy didn’t it make Juncker, Verhofstadt etc shut up and listen quietly
« Last Edit: Friday 01-Feb-2019, 11:26* by Everyone’s a Quinner »

alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #100 on: Saturday 02-Feb-2019, 08:22* »
Guessing that would require cooperation and agreement with other WTO members. That in itself is a bit of a lion’s den and other big members have already indicated that they’d not accommodate U.K. exceptionalism.

In fact the whole WTO option is really bizarre. Most of those advocating it have no idea what WTO is and how it operates. Couldn’t name one WTO regulation and what our place in WTO would look like. We’d be bulldozed politically every single time.

Sums up how badly informed and ignorant many are of the legal and political reality of or situation that again stems from a misplaced sense of our position in the world.

Worrying.
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TomBuckQuin

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #101 on: Thursday 07-Feb-2019, 14:39* »
Like him or loathe him or loaf him even 🍞:

The article 24 scenario is an interesting one which Farage suggested while in Europeon Parliment a couple of days ago. Juncker, Verhofstadt and Co. are normally seen sneering at anything Nige says however they seemed to have been caught unusally listening to him properly here, all the while looking expressionless, almost as though they fear that solution too as it makes things much easier and simpler. And they don’t like other countries like Italy warming to the idea of leaving too now do they.

A link for the video below:


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XR2snMKWbUM



I’m not saying every word he says perfect, but boy didn’t it make Juncker, Verhofstadt etc shut up and listen quietly


That didn't make me loaf him (or this weird idea that the UK is somehow just entitled to have every cake and eat all of them that he peddles with so many Brexiteers) any less. The "arrogance" Tusk has been accused of this week shows just how deluded some of our politicians are. I know much of it is politicking but if any of them do actually believe 27 other countries should bend over backwards for us after we, ourselves, asked for this... well... game over. UK politics is officially dead in that case.

I think what's consistently censored from all arguments around Brexit on this weird island they once called the United Kingdom is that Ireland and the EU have every right to strike a deal that works for them too. It's like we're trying to redefine the word "negotiation" over here. Do Brexiteers just expect the EU negotiators to ignore the fact that 27 countries are relying on them to get this right for all of them? 1 vs 27. If you were one of those wielding influence during the referendum campaign who was somehow ignorant that those would be the odds (or worse, like most people with half a brain, you knew they would be) but still hurled us into this mess then yes, there should be a special place in hell for you because you're either clinically insane or just an utter imbecile.
« Last Edit: Friday 08-Feb-2019, 10:06* by TomBuckQuin »

alexfromlondon

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #102 on: Monday 18-Feb-2019, 14:33* »
Ford, Honda, Nissan, Dyson - all moving investment and jobs overseas.

Whilst car industry changing surely Brexit partly to blame. There will be a knock on impact on connected jobs and industries in supply chains that feed into these places.

Brexiteers, what do you say to those losing their jobs? Where will the investment and industry come to replace them and make use of expertise?

Project reality - the turkeys wishing for Christmas.

never sleep

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #103 on: Tuesday 19-Feb-2019, 09:30* »
Honda is not Brexit related. There are people on this board that know the situation at Honda very well.

deadlyfrom5yardsout

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Re: Brexit
« Reply #104 on: Friday 22-Feb-2019, 09:03* »
So it comes down to legal semantics. A form of words that pleases everybody re the backstop. Can't be that difficult shoorly?

 

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